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Create a database token

Limited availability

InfluxDB Clustered is currently only available to a limited group of InfluxData customers. If interested in being part of the limited access group, please contact the InfluxData Sales team.

Use the influxctl token create command to create a token that grants access to databases in your InfluxDB cluster.

  1. If you haven’t already, download and install the influxctl CLI.
  2. In your terminal, run the influxctl token create command and provide the following:
    • Token permissions (read and write)

      • --read-database: Grants read permissions to the specified database. Repeatable.
      • --write-database: Grants write permissions to the specified database. Repeatable.

      Both of these flags support the * wildcard which grants read or write permissions to all databases. Enclose wildcards in single or double quotes–for example: '*' or "*".

    • Token description

influxctl token create \
  --read-database 
DATABASE_NAME
\
--write-database
DATABASE_NAME
\
"Read/write token for
DATABASE_NAME
"

Replace the following:

  • DATABASE_NAME: your InfluxDB Clustered database

The output is the token ID and the token string. This is the only time the token string is available in plain text.

Notable behaviors

  • InfluxDB might take some time–from a few seconds to a few minutes–to activate and synchronize new tokens. If a new database token doesn’t immediately work (you receive a 401 Unauthorized error) for querying or writing, wait and then try again.
  • Token strings are viewable only on token creation.

Store secure tokens in a secret store

Token strings are viewable only on token creation and aren’t stored by InfluxDB. We recommend storing database tokens in a secure secret store. For example, see how to authenticate Telegraf using tokens in your OS secret store.

If you lose a token, delete the token from InfluxDB and create a new one.

Output format

The influxctl token create command supports the --format json option. By default, the command outputs the token string. For token details and easier programmatic access to the command output, include --format json with your command to format the output as JSON.

Examples

In the examples below, replace the following:

  • DATABASE_NAME: your InfluxDB Clustered database
  • DATABASE2_NAME: your InfluxDB Clustered database

Create a token with read and write access to a database

influxctl token create \
  --read-database 
DATABASE_NAME
\
--write-database
DATABASE_NAME
\
"Read/write token for
DATABASE_NAME
"

Create a token with read and write access to all databases

influxctl token create \
  --read-database "*" \
  --write-database "*" \
  "Read/write token for all databases"

Create a token with read-only access to a database

influxctl token create \
  --read-database 
DATABASE_NAME
\
"Read-only token for
DATABASE_NAME
"

Create a token with read-only access to multiple databases

influxctl token create \
  --read-database 
DATABASE_NAME
\
--read-database
DATABASE2_NAME
\
"Read-only token for
DATABASE_NAME
and
DATABASE2_NAME
"

Create a token with mixed permissions to multiple databases

influxctl token create \
  --read-database 
DATABASE_NAME
\
--read-database
DATABASE2_NAME
\
--write-database
DATABASE2_NAME
\
"Read-only on
DATABASE_NAME
, read/write on
DATABASE2_NAME
"

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The future of Flux

Flux is going into maintenance mode. You can continue using it as you currently are without any changes to your code.

Flux is going into maintenance mode and will not be supported in InfluxDB 3.0. This was a decision based on the broad demand for SQL and the continued growth and adoption of InfluxQL. We are continuing to support Flux for users in 1.x and 2.x so you can continue using it with no changes to your code. If you are interested in transitioning to InfluxDB 3.0 and want to future-proof your code, we suggest using InfluxQL.

For information about the future of Flux, see the following: