Documentation

KapacitorLoopbackNode

The kapacitorLoopback node writes data back into the Kapacitor stream. To write data to a remote Kapacitor instance use the InfluxDBOutNode.

Example:

|kapacitorLoopback()
  .database('mydb')
  .retentionPolicy('myrp')
  .measurement('errors')
  .tag('kapacitor', 'true')
  .tag('version', '0.2')

Beware of infinite loops

It is possible to create infinite loops using the KapacitorLoopback node. Take care to ensure you do not chain tasks together creating a loop.

Avoid name collisions with multiple subscriptions

When using the KapacitorLoopback node, don’t subscribe to identically named databases and retention policies in multiple InfluxDB instances or clusters. If Kapacitor is subscribed to multiple instances of InfluxDB, make each database and retention policy combination unique. For example:

influxdb_1
  └─ db1/rp1

influxdb_2
  └─ db2/rp2

Available Statistics:

  • points_written: number of points written back to Kapacitor

Constructor

Chaining Method Description
kapacitorLoopback ( ) Create an kapacitor loopback node that will send data back into Kapacitor as a stream.

Property Methods

Setters Description
database ( value string) The name of the database.
measurement ( value string) The name of the measurement.
quiet ( ) Suppress all error logging events from this node.
retentionPolicy ( value string) The name of the retention policy.
tag ( key stringvalue string) Add a static tag to all data points. Tag can be called more than once.

Chaining Methods

Deadman, Stats


Properties

Property methods modify state on the calling node. They do not add another node to the pipeline, and always return a reference to the calling node. Property methods are marked using the . operator.

Database

The name of the database.

kapacitorLoopback.database(value string)

Measurement

The name of the measurement.

kapacitorLoopback.measurement(value string)

Quiet

Suppress all error logging events from this node.

kapacitorLoopback.quiet()

RetentionPolicy

The name of the retention policy.

kapacitorLoopback.retentionPolicy(value string)

Tag

Add a static tag to all data points. Tag can be called more than once.

kapacitorLoopback.tag(key string, value string)

Chaining Methods

Chaining methods create a new node in the pipeline as a child of the calling node. They do not modify the calling node. Chaining methods are marked using the | operator.

Deadman

Helper function for creating an alert on low throughput, a.k.a. deadman’s switch.

  • Threshold: trigger alert if throughput drops below threshold in points/interval.
  • Interval: how often to check the throughput.
  • Expressions: optional list of expressions to also evaluate. Useful for time of day alerting.

Example:

    var data = stream
        |from()...
    // Trigger critical alert if the throughput drops below 100 points per 10s and checked every 10s.
    data
        |deadman(100.0, 10s)
    //Do normal processing of data
    data...

The above is equivalent to this example:

    var data = stream
        |from()...
    // Trigger critical alert if the throughput drops below 100 points per 10s and checked every 10s.
    data
        |stats(10s)
            .align()
        |derivative('emitted')
            .unit(10s)
            .nonNegative()
        |alert()
            .id('node \'stream0\' in task \'{{ .TaskName }}\'')
            .message('{{ .ID }} is {{ if eq .Level "OK" }}alive{{ else }}dead{{ end }}: {{ index .Fields "emitted" | printf "%0.3f" }} points/10s.')
            .crit(lambda: "emitted" <= 100.0)
    //Do normal processing of data
    data...

The id and message alert properties can be configured globally via the ‘deadman’ configuration section.

Since the AlertNode is the last piece it can be further modified as usual. Example:

    var data = stream
        |from()...
    // Trigger critical alert if the throughput drops below 100 points per 10s and checked every 10s.
    data
        |deadman(100.0, 10s)
            .slack()
            .channel('#dead_tasks')
    //Do normal processing of data
    data...

You can specify additional lambda expressions to further constrain when the deadman’s switch is triggered. Example:

    var data = stream
        |from()...
    // Trigger critical alert if the throughput drops below 100 points per 10s and checked every 10s.
    // Only trigger the alert if the time of day is between 8am-5pm.
    data
        |deadman(100.0, 10s, lambda: hour("time") >= 8 AND hour("time") <= 17)
    //Do normal processing of data
    data...
kapacitorLoopback|deadman(threshold float64, interval time.Duration, expr ...ast.LambdaNode)

Returns: AlertNode

Stats

Create a new stream of data that contains the internal statistics of the node. The interval represents how often to emit the statistics based on real time. This means the interval time is independent of the times of the data points the source node is receiving.

kapacitorLoopback|stats(interval time.Duration)

Returns: StatsNode


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Flux is going into maintenance mode and will not be supported in InfluxDB 3.0. This was a decision based on the broad demand for SQL and the continued growth and adoption of InfluxQL. We are continuing to support Flux for users in 1.x and 2.x so you can continue using it with no changes to your code. If you are interested in transitioning to InfluxDB 3.0 and want to future-proof your code, we suggest using InfluxQL.

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